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Silver Prices Today, Live Spot Prices & Historical Charts

Today's Silver price is

Silver Spot Price Spot Change
Silver Price per Ounce $24.09 -0.12
-0.5%
Silver Price per Gram $0.77 -0.01
-0.5%
Silver Price per Kilo $774.51 -3.86
-0.5%

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Money Metals Exchange's interactive silver chart allows you to check the price of silver today or historical silver prices dating back 20 years. Hover over the chart to see the spot price for that particular day.

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Discover the Basic Truth about Silver Prices

It is easy to understand the universal appeal of silver. Beginner and expert investors around the world choose silver more than any other precious metal. The price of silver per ounce is lower than Gold, making it accessible for beginners with a limited budget.

Experienced investors recognize silver has value as both an investment and monetary metal. Diverse holdings are a key to financial success. Discover the basic truth about the current silver price and what makes silver such an alluring investment opportunity.

Silver prices

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Silver Prices Yesterday and Today

Historic Silver Coin

It is estimated silver coins could be the oldest mass-produced form of coinage. Since the time of the Greeks, people have used silver coins. Ancient Persian coins date back to between 612-330 BC.

Collectible coins range in value, based on the demand, condition, and rarity. Silver coins have been used as currency around the world. Silver bullion coins and bars, as well as silver paper, are a solid investment, regardless of inflation.

The value of money fluctuates based on each government. Silver is an international way to store value. Any investment conversation will usually focus on the unpredictability of currency and stocks. For this reason, people continue to invest in precious metals such as silver and gold products, as well as platinum and palladium.

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Beyond the Silver Standard

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Decades ago, the silver standard came to an end in developed countries, which means silver was no longer considered legal tender. Some countries, including the USA, continue to mint bullion and collectible coins.

An example is the American Silver Eagle, which has a nominal face value i.e. One Dollar coin. The Canadian Silver Maple Leaf coins are legal tender valued at about USD $5 per ounce. Privately minted coins are referred to as silver rounds, which are not legal tender.

However, hard money enthusiasts may use them as investment vehicle. Most have commemorative designs and have a weight of 1 troy ounce of silver.

The current demand for silver is for industrial applications and investment purposes, including bullion coins and exchange traded products. There continues to be a strong market for silver around the world, as evidenced by the averages and NYSE.

Get to Know the Spot Price of Silver

When investors check the NASDAQ live feed in the morning or go online to visit a website to find out the current value of silver, the spot price is what matters. This refers to the price silver can be exchanged and delivered right now.

"Whether an investor is buying, trading, or selling silver, it is important to verify the spot price."

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It is the current trading value of silver and other precious metals, as well as certain other commodities. Whether an investor is buying, trading, or selling silver, it is important to verify the spot price. COMEX is reliable source to access indices for the price of silver, as the prices today will not be the same as yesterday, an hour ago, or in the future.

Smart investors check the chart for current rates right before they buy precious metals. They also verify the reliability of the resources they use, rather than relying on a comment published by a writer who might not be aware of the spot price of silver today. The Money Metals website is a great source for market news, as is Zero Hedge.

From am to pm, the latest daily charts are important to make smart purchases from dealers who reply instantly. A skilled investor gets to know the markets, including real-time ratio on prices for oil, gold and silver, and has a calculator handy at all times. There are also online precious metal calculators to verify an amount quoted to try to avoid a significant loss before signing any contracts.

How is the Silver Spot Price Determined?

Traders determine silver and gold spot prices on futures exchanges. A Spot contract can change hands in London and Shanghai when U.S. markets are closed. But the largest and most influential market for metals prices is the U.S. COMEX exchange. The quote for immediate settlement at any given time is effectively the Spot market price.

Spot (paper) prices can sometimes diverge from real-world pricing in the markets for physical precious metals. For example, during periods of extreme stress in markets it may be impossible to obtain physical metal anywhere near the quoted spot price. Premiums on retail bullion products may surge as a consequence. When the physical market diverges from the paper market, wholesale over the counter prices may be more realistic than spot prices.

Why Can't I Buy Silver at the Spot Price?

Retail bullion products including bars, rounds, and coins carry small premiums over spot prices. The premium includes minting costs plus the dealer's profit. The premium also incorporates any wholesale premiums the dealer must pay to acquire the inventory.

Why Do I Have to Pay a Premium for Silver Coins?

Premiums vary according to market conditions. When demand is soft, premiums may fall, especially on secondary market products such as pre-1965 U.S. silver coins. Secondary market products - items that are being resold rather than sold for the first time as brand new - can often be purchased at a discount to newly minted products and very close to actual spot prices.

Why are Silver Premiums so High?

Premiums represent a combination of factors. For newly minted coins, rounds, and bars, the cost of manufacturing is a major factor. Mints and refiners set manufacturing charges based on the cost of labor and equipment, not on the spot price for the metal. These costs do not follow the silver price downward – or upward for that matter.

Another factor in premiums is demand. And demand for physical silver is setting records – the opposite of what is happening in the markets for paper silver. Dealers are bidding aggressively for physical inventory, putting upward pressure on premiums.

This dynamic is compounded by short supply when it comes to bullion products such as pre-1965 U.S. silver dimes, quarters, and half dollars. Mints and refiners aren’t producing any more.

Both the bid and the ask premiums for the pre-1965 coins are significantly higher than in 2010 – the last time silver traded below $20/oz. The difference is in investor perceptions.

In 2010, silver was nearing recent highs and more people were willing to sell. Currently, silver spot prices are less than half the 2011 highs and virtually everyone who owns pre-1965 coins is holding out for a recovery.

Just make sure your dealer is pricing competitively and pay attention to the premiums being offered should you wish to sell. Beyond that, higher silver premiums signal the existence of a strong market for physical, coins, rounds, and bars, and that’s good news for investors.

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